Longfield Academy aspires to create rich learning experiences and opportunities for all its students. This is supported through a consistent, high quality approach to teaching that ensures no student is left behind and that all students are challenged to achieve their very best. Lessons are planned to be exciting, engaging,  inspiring and personalised. Students are constantly encouraged to be reflective and independent learners that look beyond the immediate and make connections across the curriculum.

Leigh Academies Trust – Curriculum Statement

Our central purpose is to ensure that all students within Leigh Academies Trust achieve the highest standards. These standards apply to all that students do.

We aim to develop a coherent curriculum that builds on young people’s experiences and prior learning, which enables all young people to become successful learners, confident individuals and responsible citizens.

Our Curriculum intentions:

  • Instill in students a thirst for learning.
  • Challenge and inspire every student to achieve high standards and make better than expected progress.
  • Close the gap and enable those not achieving age-related expectations to catch up with their peers.
  • Promote high standards in literacy, numeracy and ICT capability.
  • Provide continued entitlement to a coherent, broad and balanced curriculum.
  • Have and be able to use high-quality learning and thinking skills and become independent learners.
  • Be relevant to our students and prepare them for the here and now, for the next phase of their education, and for their future.
  • Widen horizons and raise aspirations about the world of work and further and higher education.
  • Develop the skills and attributes to enable students to participate fully and positively in democratic, modern Britain.
  • To provide a wide range of opportunities to develop Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural awareness.
  • Help students recognise that personal well-being is essential to success and lifelong learning.

We expect from students:

  • A commitment from each student to work and to learn.
  • Self-reliance, resilience and a sense of responsibility.
  • Respect and tolerance for others.

In response to the statement above, Longfield Academy provides a curriculum that is appropriate to the students it serves. The offer is described in the Prospectus so that prospective parents know what we provide and can take account of it in deciding if Longfield Academy is the right school for their son or daughter.

The academic year is organised around six modules of learning with reporting on student progress at least twice each year.

The Academy operates a school day of 5, 1 hour lessons. The exception to this is Wednesdays when students leave at the start of the afternoon after 4 lessons. The timetable is structured over a fortnight, thus providing 48 lessons per fortnight.

curriculum intent and implementation

KS3

Years 7

All students study the same broad curriculum and spend around 60% of their time physically located within their College and 100% of their time within College based groups. Subjects studied are Mathematics, English, Science, Design & Technology, ICT, Spanish, French, Humanities, Drama, Music, Art and PE. All are taught through the framework of the MYP, providing students with explicit skills and aptitudes.

Years 8 & 9

The year group is divided in uneven ‘halves’ (4 classes in one ‘half’, 3 in the other) for the core subjects of English, Mathematics and Science. For the remaining subjects teaching continues to be organised by College group. Subjects remain the same as Year 7 with further development of skills and attributes through the MYP.

KS4

The Academy runs a 2-year Key Stage 4 (KS4), Years 10 and 11. The Academy KS4 Options Booklet is issued in February of Year 9.

At Key Stage 4, all students study English Language, English Literature and Mathematics at GCSE. They also have a lesson of Physical Education. This is not examined.

Based on Year 9 outcomes some students follow a Triple Science course and sit Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSEs. The remainder follow the Combined Science GCSE course, the equivalent of 2 GCSEs. All students then choose one of History or Geography. Students then have a free choice of 3 (2 for 2021) further subjects from a broad range across the whole curriculum (listed at the foot of this policy). Where appropriate some students are directed towards the EBacc suite of subjects.

In addition to the subject-based curriculum there are several cross-curricular themes which are covered in more than one subject area – for example, e-Safety, Economic and Industrial Awareness, Enterprise and Careers, Sex, Health, Multi-cultural and Environmental Education. These are also delivered independently through various Focus Days and through PSHE lessons that occur once a fortnight.

KS5

Students joining the Sixth Form are encouraged to follow a broad, challenging curriculum. The normal expectation for Level 3 students is that they will take three subjects for the 2 years. Exceptional students may follow 4 courses where appropriate.

In addition, all students are offered opportunities to re-take GCSE Mathematics and English Language. The Academy provides subject specific conferences for students as well as events focusing on aspects of PSHE such as Sexual Health.

This policy is reviewed annually or more frequently if that is required.

GCSE or equivalent qualifications offered (GCSE unless stated):

  • Mathematics
  • English Literature
  • English Language
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Combined Science
  • French
  • Spanish
  • History
  • Geography
  • Religious Studies
  • Art & Design
  • Photography
  • Graphics
  • Computer Science
  • Creative iMedia Cambridge National
  • Enterprise & Marketing Cambridge National
  • Music
  • Drama
  • Physical Education
  • Design & Technology
  • Construction BTEC

Longfield Academy Curriculum

The following information provides a brief outline of each subject area available at Longfield Academy. Where possible a course specification has been given. Please be aware that these are subject to change.

Should you wish to find out more details then please email info@longfieldacademy.org specifying which subject you are asking about.

English

Year Group: 7

In year 7 students study a range of novels alongside thematically linked poetry. Students have access to the Accelerated Reader scheme. Though library access is difficult during these uncertain times, we have endeavoured to create a safe remote library system within the academy and are proud to offer a range of physical and digital texts for students to read. 

In year 7 students will study three in depth modules focusing on wider questions that apply to all literature and language study: 1. How do we use language to communicate with and understand others? 2.How can a literary text reveal issues in the wider world through character and place? 3. What is the history of the English cannon and how does it influence our understanding today? 

The answers to these questions will provide students with the tools they need to embark on studying: a challenging classic literary text; a detailed genre study of the gothic era; a full Shakespeare text; and a full non fiction autobiography and media unit.

We are also delighted to work with King’s College London as a network member of their critically praised Let’s Think in English cognitive acceleration programme, offered to all year 7 and 8 students.

Year Group: 8

In year 8 all students maintain access to the Accelerated Read and myON digital reading platforms. Students will embark on a detailed genre study of the gothic tradition and a full Shakespeare text, The Merchant of Venice. Our focus concepts are of how writing can be used to give voices to the disadvantaged, as evidenced in both literary canon texts (Shakespeare, Of Mice and Men) and modern autobiography and other forms of nonfiction (I Am Malala). Students also continue their Let’s Think in English programme of study.

Year Group: 9

In years 9-11 the study of English language and English Literature are taught as discrete subjects in order to refine students’ understanding of each subject, but with each language module complimenting all literature units thematically. This provides further opportunities for interleaving knowledge and skills across both subjects, whilst supporting students to fully understand the expectations of the distinct subjects at GCSE. High quality cannon texts are again taught in the last stage of KS3(Y9, Lord of the Flies, Twelfth Night, Journey’s End) with our language units matching these with language units focusing on contemporary texts (Bias in the Modern Media, Gender and Identity in the Short Story, Gender in the Modern Media, Travel Writing and Dystopian Fiction and Scientific Exploration)

Mathematics

Year 7

Topics covered: Place value & General Arithmetic, Order of Operations, Directed Numbers, Algebraic Manipulation, Angles, 2D Shape, Area and Perimeter, Coordinates and Transformations, Prime Factorisation, Fractions, Ratio and Proportion, Percentages. 

Year 8

Topics covered: Prime Factorisation, Fractions, Percentages, Sequences, Equations and Inequalities, Transformations, Linear Graphs, Ratio and Proportion, Data, Estimation, Circles and Composite Shapes.

Year 9

Topics covered: Coordinates, Linear Graphs, Proportion, Standard Form and Scale, Rounding, Sequences, Expanding and Factorising, Changing the Subject, Circles, 3D Shapes, Construction, Congruence, Pythagoras, Polygons and Angles, Linear Equations and Inequalities, Graphical Solutions, Probability, Data, Scatter Graphs.

Science

Year Group: 7

Topics covered: Cells, structure and function of body systems, particles and their behaviour, elements, atoms and compounds, forces and motion, reproduction, chemical reactions, acids and alkalis, sound, light, space.

Year Group: 8

Topics covered: Periodic table, health and lifestyle, electricity, energy and magnetism, separation techniques, metals and acids, the structure of the Earth, climate change and recycling, processes of the ecosystem, adaptation and inheritance.

Year Group: 9

Topics covered in four Units;

Unit A – Cells, microscopes, atoms, mixtures and compounds, density and pressure

Unit B – Health and disease, periodic table, ions, ionic and metallic bonding, scalar and vector quantities, speed and acceleration, distance/ time graphs and forces

Unit C – Plant organisation, transport in plants, the nervous system, reflex reactions, covalent bonding, groups of the periodic table, energy, renewable and non-renewable resources, power and work done

Unit D – Human defence to disease, drugs and vaccines, the immune response, organisation of an ecosystem, the earth’s atmosphere, gas tests, Newton’s Laws, forces and elasticity

History

Year Group 7:

Topics covered:

History skills, use of historical sources, Grauballe and Tolland Man, Norman Conquest, Battle of Hastings, Castles, The Feudal System, Medieval Life, The Power of the Monarchy –  Henry VIII

Year Group 8:

Topics covered:

Industrial Revolution, Slavery, Empire, First World War, Second World War, Holocaust

Year Group 9:

Topics covered:

Medicine Through Time from ancient times to the modern period.

Geography

Year Group: 7

Topics covered: Map skills, Eynsford fieldwork project, Brazil, Ecosystems

Year Group: 8

Topics covered: Hazards, World water and river flooding, Amazing places

Year Group: 9

Topics covered: The coastal environment. Our human world, Cold environments, Wild weather, The UK

Religious Studies

Year Group: 7

Topics covered:

1) Individuals and Ideas in faith – Who were Jesus and the Buddha? What are the main things that Christians and Buddhist believe about these two people? What do Christians and Buddhists believe happens when we die?

2) Festivals – What are the main festivals celebrated by Christians, Jews, Hindus and Buddhists? What happens during these celebrations and what is their importance in the wider community?

Year Group: 8

Topics covered:

1) Prejudice and discrimination – What are the causes and impacts of prejudice and discrimination? Why does it exist in our society? What can we do to end it? What do religious believers think about it?

2) Religion and life ethics – What is the Sanctity of Life and should we abide by it? What do different religions believe happens when we die and can we affect this outcome by our actions when alive? A consideration of abortion and euthanasia – should we allow these things to happen? What are the religious perspectives on this and do we agree? Should we experiment on/ eat animals? Is this ok if it helps us to live?

Year Group: 9

Topics covered:

1) Beliefs in Buddhism – What is Buddhism? What are its main beliefs about suffering in the world, it’s cause and its cure? What do Buddhists believe happens when we die and can we control this?

2) Beliefs in Christianity – What is Christianity? What do Christians believe about the nature of God? Who was Jesus and what is his role in the life of an ordinary Christian? What do Christians believe happens when we die and can we control this?

3) Crime and Punishment – Why do people commit crimes? What punishments do we have, what are their aims and do they work? Can human nature be blamed for crime? Should we bring back the death penalty in the UK?

4) Practices in Christianity – What does it mean to be a Christian? How does a person’s faith impact on their lives? What festivals, acts of worship or rites of passage do Christians follow and what is the meaning and purpose of these?

5) Religion and families – What do different religious groups believe about divorce, same sex marriage, contraception, the role of parents etc and do I agree with their views?

6) Peace and conflict – What are the causes of war and conflict? Can the aims ever justify the means? Are nuclear weapons ever acceptable for use in conflict? What is a pacifist and what are their views on war and conflict? What inspires them to think this way?

French

Year Group: 7

This year the year 7s are experimenting a new methodology and way of learning a language by focusing on phonics and grammatical points.

French and Spanish:

Topics covered:

Module 1: Identities and relationships (Name, age, family members and friends, physical appearance, likes and dislikes)

Module 2: Local and international places (Where you live, your house, places in town, your region)

Module 3: In and out of school (School subjects, likes and dislikes, timetable, description of school)

Module 4: More school life (Description of teachers, likes and dislikes and reasons, school rules, after school activities)

Module 5: Traditions in different cultures (Important dates, celebrations and festivals, study of specific festivals/celebrations).

Module 6: Traditions in different cultures (Research on specific festivals, celebrations and customs).

Year Group: 8

French and Spanish:

During lessons, students experience and undertake various teaching techniques in order to practise their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Topics covered:

Module 1: Media and new technologies (Likes and dislikes, opinions and preferences)

Module 2: The wider world (Where you live, your house,  your region and community)

Module 3: Lifestyle and Healthy living. (Food and activities)

Module 4: Holidays and trips (Focus on the past tense)

Module 5: Holidays, dates, carnivals and festivals (focus on the past tense)

Module 6: Tourism and culture (Geography, typical facts, environment)

Year Group: 9

French and Spanish:

During lessons, students experience and undertake various teaching techniques in order to practise their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Topics covered:

Module 1: Me and my social life (Describe yourself, talking about Facebook, Invitations, types of music)

Module 2: Me in the world (My rights and priorities, shopping, human rights issues) 

Module 3: Healthy living (Parts of the body, sports, plans to get fit, levels of fitness) 

Module 4: Festivals and celebrations. (Dates, festivals, likes and dislikes, buying food, a future trip)

Module 5: Future plans (The importance of languages, description of a job, my ambitions)

Module 6: Me and the world (Good and disastrous holidays, tourist attractions)

Spanish

Year Group: 7

This year the year 7s are experimenting a new methodology and way of learning a language by focusing on phonics and grammatical points.

French and Spanish:

Topics covered:

Module 1: Identities and relationships (Name, age, family members and friends, physical appearance, likes and dislikes)

Module 2: Local and international places (Where you live, your house, places in town, your region)

Module 3: In and out of school (School subjects, likes and dislikes, timetable, description of school)

Module 4: More school life (Description of teachers, likes and dislikes and reasons, school rules, after school activities)

Module 5: Traditions in different cultures (Important dates, celebrations and festivals, study of specific festivals/celebrations).

Module 6: Traditions in different cultures (Research on specific festivals, celebrations and customs).

Year Group: 8

French and Spanish:

During lessons, students experience and undertake various teaching techniques in order to practise their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Topics covered:

Module 1: Media and new technologies (Likes and dislikes, opinions and preferences)

Module 2: The wider world (Where you live, your house,  your region and community)

Module 3: Lifestyle and Healthy living. (Food and activities)

Module 4: Holidays and trips (Focus on the past tense)

Module 5: Holidays, dates, carnivals and festivals (focus on the past tense)

Module 6: Tourism and culture (Geography, typical facts, environment)

Year Group: 9

French and Spanish:

During lessons, students experience and undertake various teaching techniques in order to practise their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

Topics covered:

Module 1: Me and my social life (Describe yourself, talking about Facebook, Invitations, types of music)

Module 2: Me in the world (My rights and priorities, shopping, human rights issues) 

Module 3: Healthy living (Parts of the body, sports, plans to get fit, levels of fitness) 

Module 4: Festivals and celebrations. (Dates, festivals, likes and dislikes, buying food, a future trip)

Module 5: Future plans (The importance of languages, description of a job, my ambitions)

Module 6: Me and the world (Good and disastrous holidays, tourist attractions)

ICT

KS3 Overview – Digital Design – MYP

In years 7, 8 and 9 we follow the Middle Years Program for digital design. Students will complete two extended projects each year which covers a range of ICT and Computer Science topics. Below is a breakdown of what is covered in each year group.

Year Group: 7

Students will be introduced to what it means to be a Longfield Learner. This will involve an introduction to their school usernames, passwords and Google classroom expectations. Students will also have the MYP – Digital Design curriculum explained to them and how this will look over the three year period of study. Students will then be introduced to their first project which is all about staying safe online. This project involves students creating their own e-safety presentation for a specific age range. 

The second extended project focuses more on the Computer Science side of our curriculum. This introduces students to the new topic which is programming with Scratch. The project has a wider community theme to it and runs in conjunction with the Science Department and their work on reusing plastics. Students will be made aware of the impact that plastics are having on our environment, in particular the ocean and will create a small game that promotes this message. 

Year Group: 8

In year 8 we continue to develop students’ understanding of both ICT and Computer Science. The first extended project that students will be introduced to for this year which will have a Computer Science theme. This will be the first time that students have experienced Python as a programming language. Students will develop their programming knowledge within Python and will create a GCSE grade converter for parents to use. 

The second extended project focuses more on the ICT side of our curriculum. Students will be introduced to the new topic which is creating digital graphics in either Adobe Fireworks or Adobe Photoshop. Students will design and produce their own digital media to meet a client’s needs.

Year Group: 9

In year 9 we continue to develop students’ understanding of both ICT and Computer Science. However, due to the structure of the new curriculum, Business studies will be introduced into our extended projects. Students will be introduced to the first extended project for the year which will have both a Business and ICT theme. Students will learn about brand identities and will then design and create a series of digital media products which include;

Logo / strapline, celebrity endorsed event poster, a social media post, an animated banner, homepage for a website and the operating system home screen for a gaming console.

The second extended project focuses more on the Computer Science side of our curriculum. This introduces students to the new topic which is Algorithms. Students will have to solve a industry related problem using either Algorithms or Pseudocode and then produce a small application using either Python or MicroPython. 

Drama

Year Group: 7

Modules 1 and 2: Introduction to Voice and Characterisation

Modules 3 and 4: Greek Theatre

Modules 5 and 6: Interdisciplinary unit with English: Shakespeare; Roles within Shakespeare’s plays (Romeo and Juliet and The Tempest)

Year Group: 8

Modules 1 and 2: Physical Theatre: Stage combat, Frantic Assembly, Devising. 

Modules 3 and 4: Study of a Set Text: Too Much Punch for Judy. 

Modules 5 and 6: Reimagining Shakespeare: Macbeth

Year Group: 9

Modules 1 and 2: Study of a Set Text: DNA

Modules 3 and 4: Devising: Aberfan, Introduction to practitioners: Brecht, Berkoff, Artaud.

Modules 5 and 6: Texts in Practice; Be My Baby, Of Mice and Men, Blood Brothers

Music

Year Group: 7

Module 1: Introduction to music: Rhythm, Beat, Key terminology, Piano skills

Modules 2 and 3: Baroque music: Pachalbel’s Canon, Listening and composition skills on the piano. 

Modules 4, 5 and 6: film music: Listening and composition, piano skills. 

Year Group: 8

Module 1: Introduction to musical theatre: singing, creating storyline for a musical

Module 2 and 3: Blues –  12 bar Blues, keyboard skills

Module 4, 5 and 6: Pop music – ukulele skills. Listening and ensemble and solo performance skills. 

Year Group: 9

Module 1, 2 and 3: World Music – Latin, African and Caribbean music, Reggae, Rhythm, Dictation, piano and drum skills. 

Modules 4, 5 and 6: Jazz/World Fusion Music – Bass line and Bass guitar skills, piano skills, composition and listening skills. Solo and ensemble sk

Art

Year Group: 7

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2 – Bugs.  Students will be using visual art to create a project based on bugs to show their understanding of the principles & formal elements of Art. Students will create a piece, showing symmetry, pattern, form, space and colour.  They will be looking at a range of art and artists to help understand the different ways others create their work and the contextual influences behind it. Students will create a visual art outcome, based on the idea of bugs.

Modules 3 & 4 – Greek masks. Students will learn about the history of the Greek theatre and how people wore masks to hide their status and identity. Students will learn about Greek culture by looking at the masks which reflect old Greek characters and costumes. The Greek masks will then be used in drama for performing Theseus And The Minotaur to celebrate individual and group identity and spiritual rituals through theatre and spectacles. Students will learn how traditional and modern masks are made using decoupage, embossing and embellishing techniques. Students will then design and make their own masks based on their research and skill development.

Modules 5 & 6 – Set Design for Romeo and Juliet or the Tempest. Students will explore set design and how people interact with it on stage. Students will look at elements such as water, colours and key scenes from the play and how these can be visualised in a set design.  This project will be done in small groups and consist of three parts, a rendering, a stage diagram, and an explanation/presentation.   Each group will read a play.  The group is the design team and it will discuss the play after you read it and make decisions about what to do with the set design. Sudens will then design the set from the audience’s perspective, using proportion, have balance, contain elements of colour and contain elements of line. Students create a scaled model and present their set design to the class. 

Year Group: 8 

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2 – Portraits. Students will build on their knowledge of the formal elements focusing on patterns, lines and shapes to create stylised portraits. They will explore the focused formal elements through the exploration of zentangles and how they are used as a form of personal expression and mindfulness.  Then move onto 2D and 3D shapes and how they are used in graphic design to create geometric style portraits through paper collage and/or digital methods. 

Modules 3 & 4 – Visual words. Students will study a Set Text: Too Much Punch For Judy and the art movement Pop Art. Students will study typography and how words can visually represent sounds effects, movements and actions. Sounds are not merely described, they are very much experienced by the reader.  Students will study a pop artist and comic book creation. Then generate Onomatopoeic words from Too Much Punch For Judy and create final outcomes by using sound effects that have connection to certain characters or certain moments in the set text.

Modules 5 & 6 – Reimagining Shakespeare: Macbeth Students look at caricature as a way to reflect aspects of the students’ personalities and to mask other parts based on Macbeth characters and costume design. Students will learn about how to create concept art for film/theatre. Students will then design and create concept art based on reimagining Shakespeare by providing a way to visually express an answer to the question, “Who am I in 2021?”. 

Year Group: 9

During this year students will go through 3 topics that will give students a taste of GCSE courses offered at Key Stage 4. Projects will include elements of Graphic Communication, Photography and Art/Craft and Design. 

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2: Skateboard project. Students will use visual art to create a project based on skateboards to show their understanding of the principles & formal elements of Graphic Communication. Students will create a piece, showing colour, image & typography.  They will be looking at a range of art and artists to help understand the different ways others create their work and the contextual influences behind it. Students will create a visual outcome, based on a brief.

Modules 3 & 4: Food for thought. Food has always played a significant part in our social and cultural lifestyles. The depiction of food in art spans across cultures and all of recorded human history. Students will be studying typography in more detail and how to arrange type to create food artwork. Students will develop their work further by looking at Islamic calligraphy where they use scripts of poetry to create art which is frequently seen in art and architecture across the Islamic world. Students will create a final outcome using a chosen food poem, with typography to create their own original artwork.

Modules 5 & 6: Symbolism . This project will be a self-directed end-of-year assessment where students will be using visual art with written texts as a means to express people’s identity. They will be looking at a range of visual art and artists to help understand the different ways others create their work and the contextual influences behind it. Students will look at how objects are used in symbolic ways to identify groups and individuals. Students will create a visual art outcome, based on the idea of a self-portrait, but expressed through the use of objects that relate individually.

Design & Technology

Year Group: 7

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2:  CAD Pen.

Students will design a novelty CAD pen and research and investigate how it can promote local wildlife and the local nature reserve as a form of  communication. Students will consider ergonomics in order to make it accessible for the end user.

Modules 3 & 4: Printed Textile Design

Students will be looking at surface patterns in a textile design scenario.  Surface patterns can be applied to many types of surfaces and products through the technology of sublimation printing. Through this technology it enhances the form and function of products while still meeting aesthetic requirements. Students will look at current market trends which will help influence their designs and will look into upcycling.  

Modules 5 & 6: Design takes action

People can improve the lives of others around them through developing innovative products through modern materials (plastics). Designers are needed now more than ever, whether by creating useful products or addressing immediate needs. Students will be conducting research, brainstorming ideas, building and testing prototypes to make a line bending product that will improve the lives of those in need. 

Year Group: 8

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Maze project

The students will work through a client based project looking to sell a maze game at their gift shops and online on their english-heritageshop.org.uk website. They want this maze to appeal to 6 to 12 year olds. Students will design, develop and make one ball game in the form of a maze. They want it to have a historical theme based on English Heritage. Awareness and understanding of the material cardboard in your product and of the cost to the environment. 

Module 3 & 4: Robo Rally

STEM based project where students will investigate ‘Vex Robotics’ who are looking for new competition ideas in the form of a racecourse called Robo Rally.  Students will go through an engineering design process to design a construct of a race course that is appropriately challenging, feels fast and is fun. Students then will test out the course with a robot car. Vex robotics teams can have many different mathematical and proportional reasoning to maximise a team’s performance in competitions. Then teams will race each other on another team’s track and use maths to gain advantage over other teams to get the quickest time. 

Modules 5 & 6: Sushi packaging

Packaging is what a consumer sees first, even before the product. The best packaging solutions serve a practical purpose, yet also carry a story and communicate a brand’s values. The world needs billions of packages every day and alternatives that reduce environmental impact, and reflect brand values, are becoming ever more important. Students will be creating a sushi net box packaging that is eco-friendly, optimises  durability, recyclability, and decoration to represent Japanese culture. The net box has to be able to carry moist and greasy food which sets requirements to the material used. Material purity, hygiene, product safety and protection are important.

Year Group: 9

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Eco-Innovators.

Students will be participating in a national competition. The Government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) is looking for students aged 7-19 to create a design for on-street electric vehicle (EV) charge points that is innovative, iconic and beautiful, as part of a national schools’ competition.

By 2040, the UK Government has said it will end the sale of new conventional petrol and diesel cars and vans. To support this, many more public charge points will be needed to meet the demand from electric vehicle users. It is crucial that these chargepoint designs use space efficiently, complement existing streetscapes and are user-friendly.  Students will create technical designs and draw and use CAD software for a EV chargepoint for the local area. 

Modules 3 & 4: Architecture Project

Nature offers the best design with work typically unseen or noticed daily. Despite all the differences between organisms and the complexity of ecosystems, in nature every factor is planned and executed in perfection with all resources maximized. Architecture has been inspired by natural processes to achieve a more sustainable building using Biomimicry. 

But what would happen if we looked to nature as our inspiration for a more sustainable and efficient way to keep houses cool around the world as global temperatures rise? Students will be using biomimicry to design and model a sustainable building for urban communities to adapt to extreme heat and reduce the need for air conditioning.

Modules 5 & 6: Dyson Project 

Students will have the opportunity to work with an innovation box provided by the Dyson company. Students will work through engineering tasks set by Dyson  to help gain an understanding of what engineers do: disassemble and reassemble a real Dyson hoover , identifying design clues, to understand the engineering thinking behind how – and why – it works, understand the purpose of design briefs, product analysis and creating specifications for your own Dyson inspired product.

Food Technology

Year Group: 7

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Building blocks of meals

Students will be given guidance on planning for healthy eating – the Eatwell guide, the food groups, the job each does in our diet, sources of nutrients. They will be guided to link these foods to the ones grown and available locally and within the UK. The aim is that they can connect benefits of eating fresh, local produce to the impact on themselves – physical health and lifestyle – and others – local businesses/farmers in developing countries.    

Students will learn how to implement basic food preparation techniques and tools, such as the bridge and claw technique, coloured chopping boards and basic hand and food hygiene.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

They will make small, balanced food products using seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Modules 3 & 4:  Innovation for Inclusion

Students will consider how the development of new food products happens. We will think about how new taste/textures/cooking processes/commodities are still to be found/invented, when the world is already full of these. Students will look at what drives the innovation of new products, new needs and demands, with a focus on fairness for those who need innovative products because they cannot consume existing/traditional produce (due to special diets).  Students will use practical skills to trial basic ideas and make a range of vegetable based dishes.

Modules 5 & 6:  Choices and needs

Students will be given guidance on a variety of special diets and the reasons consumers may follow them. This will include religious, health, allergy and ethical reasons. Students will explore their own thoughts, as well as others opinions, on the advantages and disadvantages of following a special diet – whether by choice or need. Students will be asked to form an opinion in response to the statement of enquiry – do special diets improve choice for all consumers? Can the majority benefit by catering for the minority?  Students will use practical skills to make products which are suitable for chosen special diets – this should include using commodities. 

Year Group: 8

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Energy needs for life

Students will explore the changes that occur throughout life – natural and chosen – that lead to our energy requirements to be a constantly evolving and shifting entity. Students will be adapting recipes for suitability based on lifestyles/diets for beliefs/choice. Students are formally assessed on their practical skills, time management and independence in the kitchen. To prepare and cook a main meal dish that demonstrates the use of starchy foods, such as savoury rice. Students need to demonstrate the safe use of the hob, sharp knives and other small equipment and apply the principles of food safety and hygiene when cooking.

Modules 3 & 4: What’s in your food?

Students will explore the effectiveness of the written communication on food labels.  Students will be pushed to consider the implications of poor communication and whose responsibility it is. Students will plan and produce food products, influenced by appropriateness of dietary needs of groups of people. Students are formally assessed on their practical skills, time management and independence in the kitchen.

Module 5 & 6: Farm to Fork

Students will explore how choices made by brands – regarding ingredients, farming/production methods and marketing influence a culture of consumer loyalty. Students will plan and produce food products, using commodities from assurance schemes. Students are formally assessed on their practical skills, time management and independence in the kitchen. Students will be asked to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of sensory characteristics of the products they make and suggest modifications. Students will be asked to evaluate the possible impact/influence the ingredients used will have on consumer choice.

Year Group: 9

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2: Common Commodities 

Students will explore how developments in science and technology link to innovation of food products – for example how scientific and technical innovations lead to us knowing more about the functions of ingredients, special diets, production of foods in controlled conditions and mass production. 

Students will plan and practice using key, basic commodities to produce staple dishes that have vast development possibilities such as meatballs, fishcakes, fresh pasta and cheesecake.  

Modules 3 & 4: Tricks or Treats?

Students will be challenged to create “treat” style foods with nutrition ingredients. They will have to be creative and experimental in order to successfully use unconventional ingredients, such as vegetables, to create appealing treats. Students will seek to use ingredients in innovative ways, using technical knowledge of how the ingredients will behave in a dish. Students’ practicals will have a scientific drive, as students investigate how alternative commodities lead to a varied outcome. 

Modules 5 & 6:  Production Planning 

Students will be challenged to develop logical planning when creating food products for others. This will include; mathematical logic when exploring how to scale recipes up and down for varying portions and selecting ingredients for the inclusion of specific nutrients. 

Students will have to adapt the existing recipes to alter quantities and nutritional content, while keeping the integrity of the original dish. Students will experiment with amounts of commodities (in response to scaling up and down) and with alternative/replacement commodities (to meet nutritional needs), in order to find successful solutions. 

Physical Education

Year Groups: 7, 8 and 9

Topics covered:

  • Developing skills, techniques and roles in sport through winter and summer sports.
  • Performing in aesthetic activities.
  • Developing and using tactics and strategies.
  • Participating in problem solving challenges.
  • Participate in competitive activities.
  • Demonstrating personal improvement.
  • Understanding personal health and fitness.

Sports covered within lessons:

Football Netball Hockey Dance Trampolining Softball
Rugby Handball Basketball Gymnastics Rounders Cricket
Volleyball Badminton Table Tennis Tennis Athletics Orienteering
English

Year Groups: 10 & 11

Year 10 marks the beginning of GCSE study for our years 10 and 11 and the first units of study for their GCSE examinations. We cover the English literature and English language courses over two years, with students being taught each in distinct subject blocks.

In creating our units we have  sought to enrich students’ cultural capital through topics and content which have a diverse range of global issues whilst simultaneously supporting their understanding of the wider themes and environment surrounding their literature studies. 

For example when studying the post 20th century text of An Inspector Calls for literature, the language study running alongside this within discrete lessons will focus on the social issues of inequality, political unrest, socialism and capitalism, enhancing pupils understanding of these issues as they arise within the play as they sharpen their skills and understanding of language paper 1. This will also build on their understanding of global inequality as explored in ‘Who are they?(Y7), ‘Of Mice and Men’(Y8) ‘Identity and Gender’(Y9) and Broken Britain(Y11). 

In year 10 the literature texts covered are: Jekyll and Hyde or A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls and Power and Conflict Poetry.

In year 11 the literature texts covered are Macbeth and revision of all other texts.

In year 10 and 11 students study a range of fiction and non fiction based modules focused on supporting students’ ability to communicate effectively.

 

Specification: English Language GCSE Edexcel 1ENO

Specification: English Literature GCSE AQA 8702

 

GCSE English Literature Texts – 

  • Macbeth
  • Jekyll and Hyde or A Christmas Carol
  • An Inspector Calls 
  • AQA Poetry Anthology (Power and Conflict)
  • Unseen poetry

GCSE English language content:

  • Fictional texts from the 18th century onwards
  • Creative writing in a variety of forms and styles
  • Transactional and non fiction writing styles (articles, reports, reviews, speech writing ect)
  • Analysis of fiction and non-fiction texts
  • Speech writing, delivery and performance
English Language Resits

Year Groups: 12 & 13

Those students who achieved no higher than a grade 3 in either English language or English literature have extra lessons on their timetable and several opportunities in which to improve their grade.

Students will study towards the Edexcel English Language qualification 1EN0, and cover a range of fiction and nonfiction text types, and are expected to produce their own transactional and fictional writing under timed conditions.

Mathematics

Year 10

Module Foundation Higher
1 Integers, Place Value, Decimals, Indices, Powers, Roots, Factors, Multiples, Primes, Simplifying Algebra, Expressions and Substitution Calculations, Checking, Rounding, Accuracy, Bounds, Indices, Roots, Standard Form, Factors, Multiples, Primes, Manipulation of Algebraic Expressions (Brackets, Factorising etc)
2 Fractions, Decimals, Percentages, Reciprocals, Tables, Charts (Line, Pie etc), Graphs (Inc. Scatter) and Properties of 2D Shapes Surds, Fractions, Decimals, Percentages, Reciprocals, Polygons, Perimeter, Area, Circles and Pythagoras
3 Sketching 2D Shapes, Angles in Polygons Perimeter, Area, Pythagoras, Equations and Inequalities Linear Equations, Inequalities, Linear Sequences, Straight Line Graphs, Linear Simultaneous Equations, Ratio and Proportion
4 Equations 2, Inequalities 2, Sequences, Straight Line Graphs, Simultaneous Equations Probability, Average, Range, Collecting/Representing Data, Cumulative Frequency and Box Plots
5 Ratio, Proportion, Indices 2, Standard Form and Probability Histograms, Parallel Lines, Bearings, Loci, Congruence, Rearranging Formulae and Iteration 
6 Statistics, Sampling, Averages, Parallel Lines and Bearings Trigonometry/ Trigonometric Graphs, Similarity and Enlargement

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: 

Module  Foundation  Higher
1 Groundwork (Number, Algebra, Geometry, Statistics), Percentages, Indices and Roots  Groundwork (Number, Algebra, Average, Range, Fractions and Percentages
2 Algebraic Manipulation, Straight Line Graphs, Angle Facts, Accuracy, Circles, Equations and Inequalities Ratio, Proportion, Angles, Trigonometry, Graphs, Area and Volume
3 Probability, Construction, Quadratics, Quadratic Graphs, Ratio, Proportion and Compound Measures Transformations, Equations, Inequalities, Probability, Similarity, Congruence and Circle Theorems
4 Simultaneous Equations, Pythagoras, Trigonometry, Transformations, Probability, Volume and Surface Area Further Trigonometry, Algebraic Fractions, Functions, Vectors, Geometric Proof and Proportion 
5 Sampling, Bivariate Data and Statistical Graphs/ Measures Equations, Graphs and Multiplicative Reasoning
6 Revision Revision

 

Specification: Edexcel 1MA1

GCSE Mathematics Resists

Year Groups: 12 & 13

Students complete a one year GCSE program that is designed to improve their grade from Year 11. For students at Grade 3 it may be appropriate for them to follow the Higher tier. They may also be entered for the November examination series.

Specification: Edexcel 1MA0

Combined Science

Year Group: 10

Topics covered: Diseases, hormones and immunity, ecosystems, ionic, covalent and metallic bonding, cell division, photosynthesis and plants, digestive system and enzymes, rates of reaction, electrolysis and extracting metals, waves, energy, acids and alkalis, motion and forces, groups in the Periodic table, electricity and radiation.

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: Ecosystems and material cycles, electricity and electromagnetism, genetics and cell division, matter, fuels and combustion, enzymes, electrolysis and extracting metals, hormones and immunity, radiation, acids and alkalis, chemistry calculations and rates of reaction

 

Specification: Edexcel Combined Science 1SC0

Biology

Year Group: 10

Students follow the same topics as the Combined Science 2 year course for before doing the extra components required in Year 11.

Specification: Edexcel Biology 1BI0

Year Group: 11 

Topics covered: Controls systems; behaviour; biotechnology

Specification: Edexcel 2BIO1

Chemistry

Year Group: 10

Students follow the same topics as the Combined Science 2 year course for before doing the extra components required in Year 11.

Specification: Edexcel Chemistry 1CH0

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: qualitative analysis; quantitative analysis; electrolytic processes; gases, equilibria and ammonia; organic chemistry

Specification: Edexcel 2CH01

Physics

Year Group: 10 & 11

Students follow the same topics as the Combined Science 2 year course for before doing the extra components required in Year 11.

Specification: Edexcel Physics 1PH0

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: radiation in treatment and medicine; x-rays and ECGs; production, uses and risks of ionising radiation from radioactive sources; motion of particles; kinetic theory and gases

Specification: Edexcel 2PH01

History

Year Group: 10

Topics covered:

-The American West c1835-c1895                                                                             

-Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39                                                                         

-Medieval Depth Option

Specification: Edexcel, GCSE (9-1)  1H10

 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered:

-Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-39

-Medieval Depth Option

-Medicine in Britain, c1250–present

-The American West c1835-c1895

Specification: Edexcel, GCSE (9-1)  1H10

Geography

Year Group: 10

Topics cover, skills: Urban issues and challenges, Physical landscapes in the UK, The living world

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: The challenge of natural hazards, The challenge of resource management, The changing economic world, Skills

Specification: AQA GCSE 8035

Religious Studies

Year Group: 10

Topics covered:

Component 1- The study of religions: Beliefs and practices.

An investigation into the fundamental tenets of Christianity, with a focus on scripture, worship, life after death and the impact of all this on a modern believer.

 

Component 2 – Thematic studies: 

  1. Theme A: Relationships and families 
  • Contraception.
  • Sexual relationships before marriage.
  • Homosexual relationships.

Sex, marriage and divorce

  • Human sexuality including: heterosexual and homosexual relationships.
  • Sexual relationships before and outside of marriage.
  • Contraception and family planning.
  • The nature and purpose of marriage. 
  • Same-sex marriage and cohabitation.
  • Divorce, including reasons for divorce, and remarrying. 
  • Ethical arguments related to divorce, including those based on the sanctity of marriage vows and compassion. Families and gender equality 
  • The nature of families, including: 
  • the role of parents and children
  • extended families and the nuclear family.
  • The purpose of families, including: 
  • procreation
  • stability and the protection of children 
  • educating children in a faith. 
  • Contemporary family issues including: • same-sex parents • polygamy. • The roles of men and women. • Gender equality. • Gender prejudice and discrimination, including examples.

 

      2.Theme B: Religion, peace and conflict.

Religion, violence, terrorism and war
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the meaning and significance of: • peace
• justice
• forgiveness
• reconciliation.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about:
• violence, including violent protest • terrorism.
• Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about:
• reasons for war including greed, self-defence and retaliation
• the just war theory including the criteria for a just war
• holy war.
* Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about pacifism.

 

Religion and belief in 21st century conflict
*Religion and belief as a cause of war and violence in the contemporary world.
*Religious attitudes to nuclear weapons and the use of weapons of mass destruction.
*Religion and peacemaking in the contemporary world including the work of individuals influenced by religious teaching.
*Religious responses to the victims of war including the work of one present day religious organisation. 

 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: 

Component 1- The study of religions: Beliefs and practices.

An investigation into the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, with a focus on scripture, worship, life after death and the impact of all this on a modern believer.

 

Component 2 – Thematic studies: 

 

  1. a) Religion and life

The origins and value of the universe

*Religious teachings about the origins of the universe, including different interpretations of these.

*The relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views.

*Religious teachings about the value of the world and the duty of human beings to protect it, including stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder.

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the use and abuse of the environment, including the use of natural resources, pollution.

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the use and abuse of animals, including animal experimentation and the use of animals for food.

 

The origins and value of human life

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the origins of human life, including different interpretations of these.

*The relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views.

*The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life.

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about abortion, including situations when the mother’s life is at risk.

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about euthanasia.

*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about death and an afterlife. 

  1. b) Religion, crime and punishment.

Religion, crime and the causes of crime
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about:
• good and evil actions
• good and evil people.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the reasons for crime including poverty, upbringing, mental illness, addiction, greed, hate,opposition to a ‘bad’/unjust law.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about those who break the law for these reasons.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about different types of crime including hate crimes, theft and murder.

 

Religion and punishment
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the aims of punishment including: retribution, deterrence, reformation.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about suffering including causing suffering to others.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the treatment of criminals including prison, corporal punishment, community service.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about forgiveness.
*Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the death penalty.

 

Specification: AQA GCSE Religious Studies A (8062)

French

Year Group: 10

Topics covered:

Module 1: My family, my friends. Identity and culture (Theme 1)

Module 2: Freetime and hobbies. Identity and culture (Theme 1)

Module 3: Daily life and festivals. Identity and culture (Theme 1 )

Module 4: Town and countryside. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2)

Module 5: Holiday. Local, national, international and global areas of interest  (Theme 2)

Module 6: School. Current and future study and employment (Theme 3) 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered:

Module 1: Work and future plans. Current and future study and employment (Theme 3)

Module 2: The environment and world issues. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2)

Module 3: GCSE preparation and reinforcement of prior knowledge. Theme 1 Identity and culture.

Modules 4 & 5: GCSE preparation and reinforcement of prior knowledge. 

Final exam 25% per skill (listening, reading, writing, speaking)

 

Specification: AQA GCSE French 8658

Spanish

Year Group: 10

Topics covered:

Module 1: Holidays. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2) 

Module 2: School. Current and future study and employment (Theme 3)

Module 3: Family and friends. Identity and culture (Theme 1)

Module 4:Hobbies. Identity and culture (Theme 1) 

Module 5: My town. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2)

Module 6:  My town. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2)

Year Group: 11 

Topics covered:

Module 1: Work and future plans. Current and future study and employment (Theme 3).

Module 2: The environment and other world issues. Local, national, international and global areas of interest (Theme 2).

Module 3: GCSE preparation and reinforcement of prior knowledge. Theme 1: Identity and culture. Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest. Theme 3: Current and future study and employment.

Modules 4 & 5: GCSE preparation and reinforcement of prior knowledge.

Final exam 25% per skill (listening, reading, writing, speaking)

 

Specification: AQA GCSE Spanish 8696 

Computer Science

Year Groups: 10 & 11

This qualification will build on the knowledge, understanding and skills established through the Computer Science elements of the Key Stage 3 programme of study. The content has been designed not only to allow for a solid basis of understanding but to engage students and get them thinking about real world application.  The course is 100% examination based and this is split up into two components. Component 1 is based upon Computer Systems and Architecture whereas Component 2 is based upon computational thinking, algorithms and programming. Students find this course challenging and rewarding. 

Music

Music GCSE Edexcel 1MU0

Course breakdown: 40% listening written examination, 30% composition, 30% solo and ensemble performance.

Year Group: 10

Module 1: Musical Elements – Set works: Bach. Whole class ensemble performance. 

Module 2: Set works: Beethoven. Pitch and Rhythm WHole class ensemble performance. 

Module 3: Set works: Purcell. Introduction to composition on Cubase. Introduction to solo performance

Module 4: Set works: Queen. Composition techniques: minimalism. Solo performance. 

Module 5: Set works: Star Wars and Wicked. Composition. Ensemble performance practice. 

Module 6: Samba. Composition 1 completion.

Year Group: 11

Module 1: Set works revision, an Ensemble performance

Module 2: Set works revision, Composition 2 brief. 

Module 3: Composition 2 completion. Solo performance

Module 4: Revision 

Module 5: Revision

 

Specification: Edexcel GCSE Music

Art

Year Group: 10

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 – 3: Identity project: Students will explore identity; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities and cultures; what it means to be human. Students will be looking at a range of artists to help understand the different ways others create their work using different skills, techniques and processes to create various outcomes based on Identity themes. 

Modules 4 & 5: PPE project: Students will be given a question from the previous year’s exam paper to do a practice project in preparation for the following year’s real exam. Students will spend these two modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing and refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions.  

Module 6:  Refinement of year 10 art work produced so far. This module students will refine, develop and rework artwork made throughout the year and exhibit their best work in the end of year show.  

 

Year Group: 11 

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2: Identity or In The News. Students get a choice between two mini projects to develop their own project, working on their strengths, skills and fostering independent creative processes to create their own personalised project to answer Identity or In The News. 

Modules 3 & 4: Exam set by AQA. Students choose one question from the exam paper and spend these two modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing, refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions in 10 hours.  

Modules 5 & 6:  Creating coursework portfolio for the exam board: Taking all work from year 10 and year 11 projects, selecting best work to place into a coursework portfolio to be seen by the exam board and exhibited in the end of year show.

 

Specification: AQA Art and Design (Art, craft and design) 8201

Drama

Year Group: 10

GCSE Drama (AQA)

Course breakdown: 40% Devising performance and coursework, 40% written examination, 20% Practical (Texts in Practice)

Module 1: Study of Set Text: Blood Brothers

Module 2: Texts in Practice: Monologues and duologues, introduction to Stanislavski.

Module 3: Mock Texts in Practice performance, introduction to Live Theatre review. 

Module 4: Introduction to practitioners and devising techniques. 

Module 5: Devising, Set Text revision

Module 6: Performance of devising pieces. Completion of Devising Logs

 

Year Group: 11

GCSE Drama

Course breakdown: 40% Devising performance and coursework, 40% written examination, 20% Practical (Texts in Practice)

Module 1: Set Text revision, Re-introduction of Texts in Practice; acting skills.

Module 2: Texts in Practice and Component 1 revision

Module 3: Examiner visit: Texts in Practice

Module 4: Revision

Module 5: Revision. 

 

Specification: AQA GCSE Drama 8261 

Graphic Communication

Year Group: 10 

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Typography and Illustration. This project will explore different types of text and fonts to visually communicate information.  Students will be looking at a range of graphic artists to help understand the different ways others create their work using text and fonts as well as the contextual influences behind it. Students will then move onto looking at logos and experiment with text and images to create their own logo for branding.   

Modules 3 & 4 – Poster project. This project will explore poster layouts and the use of visual language to promote/persuade the target audience. Students will explore graphic artists and experiment with different hand and digital techniques to create their own poster. 

Modules 5 and 6 – PPE Project.  This end of year project will be based on 4 past exam themes and the students will have a choice of one of them to develop a project from.  Students will use their previous skills taught in past projects to develop their own projects independently and then create a final piece in a 10 hour controlled assessment.   

 

Year Group: 11 

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Packaging design for tea company. Students will design graphics for ‘Woollard’s Fine Teas’, a brand of speciality and herbal teas. They might choose to promote the healing properties of herbal teas, the freshness and purity of speciality teas or the country of origin. Students will investigate existing packaging, branding or advertising material linked with tea and produce their own work.  

Students will investigate examples of contemporary and historical tea package design, branding and advertising making drawings, colour studies and taking photographs. They will consider the relationship between the package, the product it contains and the consumer.  Drawing for different purposes using a variety of media 

  • Typography 
  • Composition and layout 
  • Colour theory and the effective use of colour  
  • Old and current artists. 
  • Cultural images and symbolism. 

Modules 3 & 4: Exam set by AQA. Students choose one question from the exam paper and spend these two modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing, refining the chosen exam question. They then plan for the exam and finally create a final outcome in exam conditions in 10 hours.  

Modules 5 & 6:  Creating coursework portfolio for the exam board: Taking all work from year 10 and year 11 projects, selecting best work to place into a coursework portfolio to be seen by the exam board and for the end of year show. Final tweaks to work for coursework if needed and then mounting and presenting work for the end of year show.  

 

Specification: AQA Art and Design (Graphic communication) 8203

Photography

Year Group: 10

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2: Vanitas. To explore the terms Memento Mori and Vanitas, its use of symbolism through objects and how it could be interpreted in a photographic outcome. Students will explore contemporary and historical still life photography and how they use photographic techniques and processes to show death and the transience and vanity of earthly achievements and pleasures.  Students will create lots of photography outcomes based on this theme.

Modules 3 & 4: Distortion. This project is to enhance creative thinking and skills through distortion. It is all about distorting photography.

Students will take a series of portraits and distort them through a series of different skills and processes to enhance their images. An opportunity to use their imagination and take a creative approach to this topic. 

Modules 5 & 6: PPE project: Students will be given a question from the previous year’s exam paper to do a practice project in preparation for the following year’s real exam. Students will spend these two modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing and refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions.  

 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: 

Modules 1 & 2: Materials. Many contemporary photographers combine a variety of materials with their photographic images. Students will explore photographers who make everyday objects,  collage using photographs together with found objects. They will use a variety of materials on which to print and display photographs. 

Students will study appropriate sources and use suitable techniques to produce their own photographic work using a variety of materials.

Modules 3 & 4: Exam set by AQA. Students choose one question from the exam paper and spend these two modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing and refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions in 10 hours.  

Module 5:  Creating coursework portfolio for the exam board: Taking all work from year 10 and year 11 projects, selecting best work to place into a coursework portfolio to be seen by the exam board and exhibited at the end of year show.

 

Specification: AQA Art and Design (Photography) 8206

Food Preparation & Nutrition

Food and Nutrition GCSE equips learners with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. It encourages learners to cook and enables them to make informed decisions about food and nutrition and allows them to acquire knowledge in order to be able to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life.

By studying food preparation and nutrition learners will be able to:  

  • demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment  
  • develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks  
  • understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health  
  • understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices  
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food  
  • understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional Welsh, British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

Year Group: 10

Topics covered: 

In Year 10 students complete many mini projects to make sure they improve their skills and give them a deeper understanding of food and the skills needed to make basic food products. They start the year with an entry to Kent Cooks, with the other mini projects throughout the year giving students knowledge of the main nutrients needed for the body, sauce making skills, pastry making, packaging design and the legal requirements in food and the catering industry. 

These projects will cover these areas:

Module 1- Nutrition and health

Module 2- Food safety and raising agents

Module 3- Food providence and cuisine

Module 4- Food science

Module 5- Food choice and meal planning

Module 6- Production/processing and food styling. 

 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered: 

Throughout the modules students will be revising for their unit 1 exam. 

Unit 1: Principles of Food and Nutrition

Written examination: 40% of qualification

The examination paper in June is 1 hour 30 minutes and contains two sections both containing compulsory questions.

Throughout the modules students will start their NEA assessment. 

Unit 2: Food and Nutrition in Action

Non-examination assessment: 60% of qualification

As part of Unit 2, assessment 1 and assessment 2 will be moderated by WJEC.

 

Specification: WJEC Eduqas Food Preparation and Nutrition 601/8093/6

Design and Technology

Year Group: 11

Topics covered NEA and Written examination.

Written exam: 2 hours

  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Throughout the modules students will be revising for their exam. Students will revising topics covering:

Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks)

A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.

Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks)

Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.

Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks)

A mixture of short answers and extended response questions.

Non exam assessment (NEA)- Exam board sets a task. 

  • Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30–35 hours approx
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Tasks includes:

  • Substantial design and make task
  • Assessment criteria:
    • Identifying and investigating design possibilities
    • Producing a design brief and specification
    • Generating design ideas
    • Developing design ideas
    • Realising design ideas
    • Analysing & evaluating
  • In the spirit of the iterative design process, the above should be awarded holistically where they take place and not in a linear manner
  • Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA
  • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence
  • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by AQA
Physical Education

Year Groups: 10 & 11

This course is made up of both practical and theoretical elements. Pupils will be assessed in three practical sports from the AQA list of accepted sports, a written piece of non exam assessment coursework focusing on the analysis and evaluation of their performance in a competitive sport, as well as two written exams. 

In year 10 pupils will cover a range of theoretical topics such as

  • Sports Psychology
  • Socio Cultural Influences
  • Health and Fitness, Training Methods
  • NEA Coursework

In year 11 pupils will cover a range of theoretical topics such as

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Movement Analysis
  • Health, Fitness and Wellbeing.

The two theoretical exams make up 60% of the overall grade.

During  years 10 and 11 pupils will be able to take part in practical activities in school where they will develop their individual skills and game play for the practical assessment.  We are able to offer in school:

  • Netball
  • Football
  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Handball
  • Trampolining
  • Table tennis
  • Athletics 
  • Cricket

If students participate in other activities outside of school that are on the approved sports list published by AQA, these can be used as part of their assessment in year 11.

The practical element of the GCSE assessment will make up 30% of the overall grade and the Non Exam Assessment coursework will make up 10% of the overall grade.

Construction and the Built Environment BTEC

Students need to cover four units in total to complete the course. 

Year Group: 10

Topics covered:

In year 10 the students will do these units and be internally and externally moderated. 

Unit 6: Exploring Carpentry and Joinery Principles and Techniques – in this unit the learner will develop an understanding of carpentry, tools and  how carpentry is used in construction. Students will build a practical frame using four different joints in the workshop. 

Unit 1: Construction Technology – this unit covers the different forms of construction that can be used for low-rise offices, retail units and homes. Learners will develop an understanding of the structural performance required for low-rise construction, and explore how substructures and superstructures are constructed. This unit will be externally assessed and the first attempt is taken in June in Year 10. 

Year Group: 11

Topics covered:

Unit 3: Construction and Design – in this unit learners will develop a broad understanding of the construction industry, the sort of projects it undertakes and the contribution it makes to wider society. Learners will also look at how client needs can shape the design of a building and develop their own design ideas to a given brief.

Unit 2: Scientific and Mathematical Applications for Construction – in this unit learners will apply scientific and mathematical knowledge, understanding and skills to practical construction contexts. Learners will develop an understanding of the scientific principles affecting the performance of construction materials and develop skills to perform mathematical calculations in construction contexts.

 

Specification: Pearson BTEC Level 1/2 First Award in Construction and the Built Environment.

Creative iMedia Cambridge National

This is a very popular option at Key Stage 4 and is suited to those students that enjoy showcasing their creative flair through the use of technology. The course is separated equally into 4 units of work worth 25% each. There are three coursework based units which are conducted under controlled assessment regulations. The units that we have picked to study are creating animations, creating websites and developing graphics. There is also an examination unit on pre-production skills. 

Enterprise & Marketing Cambridge National

Year Group: 10 & 11

This course is assessed via coursework (2 Units 25% each) and an exam (1 Unit 50%).

Topics covered: This course comprises three units. The first considers the main activities required to support a start-up business and key factors of this (R064 Enterprise and Marketing concepts -exam), topics  covered include : Functional areas of a business, external factors affecting business decisions, pricing theory, breakeven, fixed,variable and profit/loss. The second unit requires the students to create a product proposal to meet a specific need (R065 Design a business proposal- coursework). The final unit requires students to create a promotional plan for the product they created  in unit 2 (R066 Market and pitch a business proposal).

Specification: OCR Cambridge National Level 2  in Enterprise and Marketing J819, 603/0646/4

English Literature

Year Group: 12

Topics covered:

Paper 1 covers ‘Drama and Poetry pre 1900’ with the close study of a Shakespeare ‘problem’ play ‘Measure for Measure’, and a comparative unit which compares the work of a single poet such as Milton, Coleridge or Rossetti, and a play such as Ibsen’s ‘A Doll’s House’; Wilde’s ‘An Ideal Husband’ or Webster’s ‘The Duchess of Malfi’ to be selected as a combination of student interest and teacher expertise.  Due to less likelihood of theatre trips being available this year, we will need to make use of texts with a strong recorded presence where possible. 

Paper 2 covers American literature from the periods 1890-1930. Set texts are ‘The Great Gatsby’ and ‘the Age of Innocence’, as well as a broad study of the context of this period in american history, socially and politically to support the study of the set texts and a focus on close analysis skills with an unseen element counting for 20% of the final A level. 

Coursework will cover post 1900 texts from all three genres: poetry, drama and novel and varies every year. 

Year Group: 13

Topics covered:

Paper 1 covers ‘Drama and Poetry pre 1900’ with the close study of a Shakespeare ‘problem’ play ‘Measure for Measure’, and a comparative unit which compares the work of John Milton ‘Paradise Lost’ and Henrik Ibsen’s ‘A Doll’s House.’

Paper 2  covers the topic of Women in Literature with set texts ‘Sense and sensibility’ and ‘Mrs Dalloway’ as well as a broad study of the context of the of women in literature, and , social and political movements within women’s history to support the study of the set texts and a focus on close analysis skills with an unseen element counting for 20% of the final A level. 

Coursework will cover post 1900 texts from all three genres: poetry, drama and novel: a shorter piece will study Carol Ann Duffy’s ‘The World’s Wife’, asking candidates to create their own poem for the collection, and a commentary; a longer piece will ask students to compare Kazuo Ishiguro’s ‘Never Let Me Go’ and Jennifer Haley’s ‘The Nether.’

 

Specification: OCR English Literature  H472 (Linear A Level)

English Language/Literature

Year Groups: 12 & 13

A combined course that allows for a detailed study of the three main genres of literature: novel, poetry and drama; as well as a study of non-fiction texts.

Students will study an anthology of non-fiction texts; the play ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’; the novel ‘The Great Gatsby’ and the british born poet Jacob Sam -La Rose.

Students also study creative writing for the exam.

Coursework is a folder containing a short piece of original non-fiction writing, and an independent study of two texts. 1 non-fiction text is chosen from a set list- the other is a complete free choice meaning students are working very independently, and with freedom of choice in style, genre and content.

 

Specifications: OCR English Language / Literature (EMC) H474

Film Studies

Year Group 12 

Students follow an introduction to film in their first term which introduces concepts such as cinematography / editing / sound / performance / auteur/ spectatorship etc. During this time films cover a wide range of genre and filmmaker, time period and culture.

Students then study three Hollywood films spanning the time from silent to 1990. This year the study will be Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans; Double Indemnity and West Side Story. Students will focus on microelements for short answer questions, and narrative devices and structure for an essay question.

Paper 2 will ask students to consider comparisons between a small independent film, and a big blockbuster – recent choices have included Ex machina and Guardians of the Galaxy or we Need to Talk About Kevin and Star Wars The Force Awakens.

Students will also be introduced to an ideology within film such as The Outsider / Conflict or Home and Family. This will include the study of a film in a different language.

For coursework students are asked to write a film script, produce a storyboard, and show their planning for the filming of their script. Due to Covod-19 the board is allowing the storyboarding to be a prototype this year. 

Year Group 13

Students continue to build on their study from last year. In addition this year students study a film movement (French New Wave – Truffaut’s The 400 Blows) and Surrealist Film – the films of Luis Buenel.

Building on the lockdown study of documentary, students will complete their study of ‘Searching for Sugarman, and will also begin their Ideology study of ‘The Outsider’ focusing on the films The Babadook; Elephant and Yojimbo.

The main concepts remain microelements of film, aspects of narrative, auteur theory and spectatorship- but will also include the concept of the digital and how film is changing through technology.

Students will put the finishing touches to their coursework.

 

Specification: OCR Film Studies H410

GCSE Mathematics Resits

Year Group: 12 & 13

Students complete a one year GCSE program that is designed to improve their grade from Year 11. For students at Grade 3 it may be appropriate for them to follow the Higher tier. They may also be entered for the November examination series.

Specification: Edexcel 1MA0

Mathematics

Year Group: 12

Topics covered:

Module 1 Algebra and Functions (Expressions, indices, surds, quadratic functions, equations and inequalities), Statistical Sampling, Data Presentation (Measures of variation), Quantities/ Units in Mechanics (Force, velocity, speed etc. Vector and scalar quantities) and Kinematics (Graphical Representations)
Module 2 Algebra and Functions (Graphs and transformations), Coordinate Geometry (Parallel and perpendicular lines and circle geometry), Data Presentation 2 (Regression and Interpretation), Kinematics 2 (SUVAT application and motion under gravity) and Probability (Mutually exclusive events and independent events)
Module 3 Further Algebra (Algebraic division, factor theorem, trigonometric ratios/ graphs, trigonometric identities and equations, binomial expansion), Vectors and Statistical Distribution (Binomial).
Module 4 Differentiation (first/ second derivatives, gradients, tangents minima/maxima), Vectors 2 (Position Vectors and geometric problems), Force and Newton’s Laws, Statistical Hypothesis Testing.  
Module 5 Integration (Defining integrals and areas under curves), Exponentials and Logarithms. Newton’s Laws 2, Kinematics 3 (Variable force and calculus)
Module 6 Proof (Deduction and contradictions), Newton’s Laws 2 and Kinematics (Continued), LARGE DATA SET. 

Specification: Edexcel 8MAO

Year Group 13

Topics covered:

Module 1 Functions and Modelling (Modulus function, composite and inverse functions, transformations, modelling), Sequences and Series (Arithmetic and geometric progressions, sigma notation and recurrence), Binomial Theorem (Partial fractions), Regression and Correlation 
Module 2 Trigonometry (Radians, secant, cosecant and cotangent, R Cos or R Sin and Proving Identities), Moments and Probability
Module 3 Parametric Equations and Differentiation (Parametric and Cartesian forms, differentiating sinx and cos x, differentiating exponents and logarithms), Resolving Forces, Normal DIstribution and Projectiles
Module 4 Differentiation and Numerical Methods (Second derivatives, rates of change, staircase and cobweb diagrams, Newton-Raphson method), Integration (Exponentials and trigonometric functions), Normal Distribution and Application of Forces (Dynamics of a particle and equilibrium)
Module 5 Integration 2 (Substitution, by parts, partial fractions, area under graphs, limit of a sum. trapezium rule, differential equations and areas expressed parametrically), Normal distribution 2 (Statistical hypothesis testing), Vectors (3 dimensions) and Further Kinematics (Constant acceleration and variable acceleration)
Module 6 Revision and Large Data Set

Specification: Edexcel 9MAO

Physics

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Working as a Physicist; Mechanics; Electric Circuits; Working as a Physicist; Materials; Waves and Particle Nature of Light

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Working as a Physicist; Mechanics; Electric Circuits; Further Mechanics; Electric and Magnetic Fields; Nuclear and Particle Physics Materials; Waves and Particle Nature of Light; Thermodynamics; Space; Nuclear Radiation; Gravitational Fields; Oscillations

 

Specification: Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Physics PH0

Chemistry

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: atomic structure and isotopes,  the periodic table,  bonding and the shapes of molecules, chemical equations and amount of substance (moles) • ions: formulae, charge density, tests,  titrations and titration calculations, thermochemistry, organic chemistry: names and combustion of alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, dealing with polluting gases, rates of reaction, sustainability of the ozone layer, mass spectrometry and IR spectroscopy, preparative techniques and thin layer chromatography and green chemistry

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: aspects of nitrogen chemistry, equilibrium and constant calculations, analysis of industrial processes, condensation polymers, organic functional groups, amines and amides, amino acid and protein chemistry, enzyme catalysis and molecular recognition, the structure and function of DNA and RNA, dissolving and associated enthalpy changes, the greenhouse effect, redox titrations, cells and electrode potentials, colorimetry the chemical origins of colour in organic compounds, aromatic compounds and their reactions, dyes and dyeing, fats and oils, gas-liquid chromatography, carbonyl compounds and their reactions and organic synthesis

 

Specification: OCR A level Chemistry B (Salters) H443

Biology

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Biological molecules; cells, viruses and reproduction of living things; classification and biodiversity; exchange and transport

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Energy for Biological Processes; Microbiology and Pathogens; Modern Genetics; Origins of Genetic Variation; Control Systems; Ecosystems.

 

Specification: Pearson Edexcel level 3 Advanced GCE in Biology B 9BIO

Psychology

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Memory, Social Influence, Attachment, Psychopathology (Paper 1) Research Methods, Biopsychology, Approaches (Paper 2)

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Issues and Debates, Research Methods, Forensic Psychology, Eating Behaviour, Relationships (Paper 3)

 

Specification: AQA 7182

History

Year Group: 12 & 13

Topics covered:

Paper 1, Option 1H: Britain transformed, 1918–97

Paper 2, Option 2H.2: The USA, 1955–92: conformity and challenge

Paper 3, Option 33: The witch craze in Britain, Europe and North America, c1580–c1750

Paper 4- Coursework

Specification: Edexcel, A Level, 9H10

Geography

A Level Geography

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Coastal Landscapes and Change,  Regenerating Places,  Tectonic processes and hazards,  The water cycle and water insecurity.  Independent Investigation

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: The Carbon cycle and energy security, Superpowers, Globalisation, Health, Human Rights and intervention

 

Specification: Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Geography (9GE0)

Sociology

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Families and households, education, methods and methods in context.

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Crime and deviance, beliefs in society and sociological theory. In addition students will be revising all the topics from year one.

 

Specification: AQA Sociology (7192)

Art

Year Group: 12

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Basics of Art/Craft and Design 

Students use the theme of ‘Natural forms’ to learn how to manipulate and develop materials to create 2D, 3D and digital images. Students build on basic knowledge of art and develop multiple final outcomes.

Each student will develop and be guided to develop their own personal outcome based around this theme. Students will also learn critical contextual analysis of artists and essay writing skills as well as developing the following: observational drawing, dry and wet media, collage, photography, painting, illustration, graphics, sculpture, printmaking and textile techniques. 

Modules 3 & 4: Self Initiated personal project.   

Students will choose and develop a long project where they uncover personal responses to a personal investigation – some starting points will be provided however students will be allowed to explore their own themes. Emphasis on development and refinement through high-level journal based recording of new ideas and outcomes.  Essay writing based on introduction to their theme. 

Module 5 & 6: Personal project. 

Students will continue to develop outcomes and techniques within their chosen theme. They will be encouraged to develop coherent connections within their work through critical analysis and further research. Essay writing based on their research, exploration and discoveries. 

 

Year Group: 13 

Modules 1 & 2: Mock Exam. Students continue to push and develop outcomes relating to their chosen theme. Developed Ideas, 2D and 3D Technique development, mixed media experimentations and further research. The final outcomes and evaluation done under exam conditions of 15 hours. 

Essay writing on conclusion and evaluations.

Modules 3 – 5: Exam set by AQA. Students choose one question from the exam paper and spend these three modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing, refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions in 15 hours. 

  

Specification: AQA Advanced GCE in Art and Design, Art and Design (Art, craft and design) 7201

A Level Photography

Year Group: 12

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Basics of Photography 

Students use the theme of ‘Natural Forms’ to learn how to manipulate and develop photographic images. Students build on basic knowledge of the camera and develop multiple final outcomes.

Key Skills to learn 

  • Use of the camera – Aperture (DoF), Shutter Speed & ISO 
  • Framing – Rule of thirds, positioning and Point of Focus.  
  • Annotation – How to record outcomes and developments, how to dissect photographers work and how to be critical about work in order to develop.  
  • Basic lighting setup to create mood and atmosphere.
  • Use of costume and location to emphasize mood and atmosphere. 

Each student will develop and be guided to develop their own personal outcome based around the theme improving a variety of skills in the process: observational drawing, dry and wet media, collage, dark room techniques, photographing inside and outside. Students will also learn critical contextual analysis of artists and essay writing skills.

Modules 3 & 4: Self Initiated personal project.   

Students will choose and develop a long project where they uncover personal responses to a personal investigation – some starting points will be provided however students will be allowed to explore their own themes. Emphasis on development and refinement through high-level journal based recording of new ideas and outcomes.  Essay writing based on introduction to their theme. 

Module 5 & 6: Personal project. 

Students will continue to develop outcomes and techniques within their chosen theme. They will be encouraged to develop coherent connections within their work through critical analysis and further research. Essay writing based on their research, exploration and discoveries. 

 

Year Group 13 

Topics covered:

Modules 1 & 2: Mock Exam. Students continue to push and develop outcomes relating to their chosen theme: develop ideas, use digital manipulation, improve technique development, re-research, create final outcomes and evaluation done under exam conditions of 15 hours. 

Essay writing on conclusion and evaluations.

Modules 3 – 5: Exam set by AQA. Students choose one question from the exam paper and spend these three modules researching, recording, experimenting, designing, refining the chosen exam question. Plan for the exam and then create a final outcome in exam conditions in 15 hours. 

  

Specification: AQA Advanced GCE in Art and Design, Art and Design (Photography) 7206

A Level Applied Business Studies

Year Group: 12 & 13

Students will undertake a programme of assessment designed to assess not only their knowledge and understanding of business, but also the way in which this knowledge and understanding can be applied to shape their practical skill in thinking and realising their own plans about business. 

In the qualification, the learner will cover topics such as:

  •  the role of finance in planning an enterprise, analysing and making financial decisions
  •  how business organisations use the human, physical and financial resources at their disposal to achieve their dynamic goals 
  •  the nature of enterprising behaviour and how this can be personally utilised to best exploit entrepreneurial opportunities within specific market conditions. 
  • how to manage and lead people by exploring motivation and leadership theories. 
  • the skills and processes required to develop, present and evaluate a business proposal.

This course is made up of internally assessed units (3 units) and externally assessed units in the form of 2 exams and one controlled assessment (3 units). 

 

Specification: AQA Applied Business 601/7145/5

Financial Studies

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: This course comprises two units Financial Capability for the Immediate and Short Term which includes the importance of this, looks at the financial services, cash flow to meet financial needs and individuals responsibilities in terms of personal financial considerations. The second unit is Financial Capability for the Medium and Long Term. It considers the need for budgeting, the risks and rewards of managing personal finances and creates a pathway for developing comparison skills with regards to  the different financial service products available on the market.

Specification: The London Institute of Banking and Finance, Level 3 Certificate in Financial Studies, 600 / 8537 / X

 

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: This course comprises two units Sustainability of an Individual’s Finance which considers the importance of this, develops skills to do this, external factors which affect this and the importance of creating and monitoring budgets. The second unit is the Sustainability of the Financial Services which explores the financial services system and looks at how financial services providers work and compete with one another, their priorities and responses to external influences in maintaining financial sustainability. They will also look at the marketing techniques used by these financial services and whether these practices are moral and ethical in terms of industry standard practice. 

Specification: The London Institute of Banking and Finance, Level 3 Diploma in Financial Studies, 600 / 8551 / 4

In order to receive the Diploma, the Certificate must have been sat in year 12. 

Economics

The course is structured into four themes and consists of three externally examined papers. Students build knowledge and understanding of core economic models and concepts in Themes 1 and 2, and then build on this and apply their knowledge to more complex concepts and models in Themes 3 and 4. Students will need to apply their knowledge and understanding to both familiar and unfamiliar contexts in the assessments and demonstrate an awareness of current economic events and policies.

Theme 1: Introduction to markets and market failure-

 This theme focuses on microeconomic concepts. Students will develop an understanding of: ● nature of economics ● how markets work ● market failure ● government intervention.

Theme 2: The UK economy – performance and policies –

measures of economic performance ● aggregate demand ● aggregate supply ● national income ● economic growth ● macroeconomic objectives and policy.

Theme 3: Business behaviour and the labour market-

This theme develops the microeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 1 and focuses on business economics. Students will develop an understanding of: ● business growth ● business objectives ● revenues, costs and profits ● market structures ● labour market ● government intervention.

Theme 4: A global perspective

 This theme develops the macroeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 2 and applies these concepts in a global context. Students will develop an understanding of: ● international economics ● poverty and inequality ● emerging and developing economies ● the financial sector ● role of the state in the macroeconomy.

 

Specification –  Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Economics A 601/4106/2

Physical Education

Year Groups 12 & 13 

In years 12 and 13 we offer pupils the opportunity to take A Level Physical Education. This qualification allows students to play to their strengths and gain dynamic theoretical and practical skills for further education or work.

Subject content

  • 1. Applied anatomy and physiology
  • 2. Skill acquisition
  • 3. Sport and society
  • 4. Exercise physiology
  • 5. Biomechanical movement
  • 6. Sport psychology
  • 7. Sport and society and the role of technology in physical activity and sport

Assessment

Pupils will sit two written exams which are 2 hours long and will make up 70% of their overall grade. They will also complete a written analysis and evaluation of a sporting performance and will also be assessed as a performer or coach in the full sided version of one activity, which will make up 30% of the overall grade.

Specification:  AQA Physical Education A Level (7528)

Extended Project

Year Group: 12 & 13

Students are offered the opportunity to complete the extended project in year 13. The project is introduced after Easter in year 12, and students undertake most of the independent research over the summer. The autumn term of year 13 is spent writing the project up.

Students undertake the EPQ in addition to their other 3 A levels. It carries the same weight as an AS level for UCAS points, and is very popular with universities as it shows a student has the ability to undertake an original piece of research.

The Extended Project will develop and extend from one or more of the student’s study areas and/or from an area of personal interest or activity outside their main programme of study. It will be based on a topic chosen by the student(s) and agreed as appropriate by the teacher.

Delivery of the Extended Project Qualification will involve teaching of the necessary skills through classroom delivery and supervision by the teacher on a one to one basis. This is done every Wednesday morning and attendance at the sessions is mandatory.

Students are required to:

  • choose an area of interest
  • draft a title and aims of the project for formal approval by the teacher
  • plan, research and carry out the project
  • deliver a presentation to a non-specialist audience
  • provide evidence of all stages of project development and production for assessment.

Specification: AQA Extended Project Qualification 7993

Forensic Science

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Principles and Applications of Science, Practical Scientific Procedures and techniques, Science Investigation Skills, Physiology of Human body systems

 

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Forensic Investigation Procedures in Practice, Forensic Fire Investigation

 

Specification: Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma in Forensic Investigation

Performing Arts

In this course you can specialise in: 

  • Acting
  • Dance
  • Music
  • Music Tech

Year Group: 12

Units covered:

Unit 3: Influential Performance Practice: Exploring context and preparing for a performance from a piece of repertoire

Unit 2: Proposal for a Commissioned Brief (externally moderated controlled assessment)

Unit 8: Performing Repertoire (Study of an influential artist from the performing arts industry [e.g. Brecht, Queen, Bob Fosse])

 

Year Group: 13

Unit 8: Performing repertoire continued

Unit 1: Preparing to work in the Performing Arts Sector

Unit 4: Combined Arts – Combining your own specialism with a second one of your choice. 

 

Specification: OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Award Performing Arts

Level 3 Certificate/Diploma in Criminology

Year Group: 12

Topics covered: Changing awareness of crime (controlled assessment) Criminological theories (external exam) Students will be awarded a Level 3 Certificate at the end of the year.

Specification: WJEC Criminology 601/6249/1 

Year Group: 13

Topics covered: Crime scene to courtroom (controlled assessment) Crime and punishment (external exam). Students will be awarded a Level 3 Diploma at the end of the year.

Specification: WJEC Criminology 601/6248/X

Professional Cookery

Year Groups: 12 & 13

Level 1 

The Level 1 Diploma in Introduction to Professional Cookery will suit you if you are new to the industry.

The course will cover food safety, health & hygiene, knife skills, practical cooking skills and give you insight to your chosen career.

Over the course of the year, Level 1 comprises 5 written assignments, 6 question & answer papers, 6 practical tests & 2 end of year practical tests based on the knowledge learnt throughout the course.

Level 2 

The Level 2 Diploma will suit you if you have some basic skills and experience as a chef, probably from a role where you work under supervision and you want to gain a formal qualification and increase your skills so that you can take on a more senior role.

The Level 2 course works on the knowledge gained from Level 1, building on that and enhancing  skills, initiation & confidence.

The course comprises 5 written assignments, 10 question & answer papers, 8 practical tests & 2 end of year practical tests based on the knowledge learnt throughout the course.

Level 3

This level is ideal if you have worked as a chef for some time – you have plenty of experience and you may already supervise others or manage resources. You want to develop your skills further, perhaps to work as a senior chef or restaurant manager.

Building on prior learning, the Level 3 course gives more of an insight into kitchen management, furthering skills & giving a deeper insight into hospitality & catering.

The course comprises 4 assignments, 9 question & answer papers, 8 practical tests & 2 end of year practical tests based on knowledge learnt throughout the course.

 

Specification: City & Guilds Professional Cookery 7100